Using what you have learned in this unit, can you explain the behavior of the nurses in this situation?
August 16, 2018
Post a brief description of the photo essay you selected. Explain whether you see evidence of community empowerment
August 16, 2018

What are some of the challenges that you feel you might face when participating in collaborative session in the field?

Making Collaboration Work

Resources

  • Discussion Participation Scoring Guide.
  • Case 1 (Joseph) Collaboration Meeting.
  • Case 2 (Mark) Collaboration Meeting.

The readings this week present why collaboration is important. The media piece engaged you in a collaborative situation involving a real-world case. Based on what you learned this week regarding the collaborative process, address the following:

  • What are some of the challenges that you feel you might face when participating in a collaborative session in the field?
  • How might you address these challenges?

Case 1 Collaboration Meeting

Introduction

The purpose of this exercise is to observe a collaborative session focused on a specific case. As you observe, you may want to take notes for your reference. Once you have read through the entire session, you will be asked to synthesize the multiple viewpoints that were given and come up with additional recommendations that might be relevant to the team. You will take this information back to the course room to complete several activities with this case.

The Meeting

Nicole Chesapeake, Case Manager:

Good afternoon, everyone. Thanks for being here today. The team has been brought together to discuss Joseph Lansing and his recent suspension from Samuals Elementary School for stating he wanted to bring a gun to school. Each of you should have received a case file prior to this meeting.

Just to recap, Joseph has attended Samuals since kindergarten. He is currently in the second grade after repeating first grade last year following a significant number of absences. He was recently removed from his home and the care of his mother and placed in foster care. He didn’t have to change schools. Since the change his attendance has been consistent and academically he is doing well. He was sent to the principal’s office earlier this week after several of his classmates overheard him stating that he was going to bring a gun to school. When asked why he wanted to do this, he stated, “I want to be closer to my mother.” The purpose of this meeting is to discuss Joseph and how to proceed. The team will look at the more appropriate punishment and recommendations for an intervention plan to assist this student. We will start the discussion with Mrs. Porter, Joseph’s classroom teacher.

Mrs. Porter, Joseph’s Classroom Teacher:

Good afternoon, everyone. It was during my class that Joseph made the disturbing comments. We were at recess and he mentioned this to other students who were in line around him. I didn’t overhear the statement personally, but I was approached by several students. Once I heard the story from the other students, I followed school procedure and called the office. I then took James into the hall and waited for the assistant principal to come. Mrs. Jobes and Mr. Jones, Joseph’s counselor, met me in the hall and escorted Joseph to the office. I was so surprised and upset about all of this. This boy has been through so much.

Dr. Matt Manning, Joseph’s Psychologist:

I have a quick question for you. Can you tell us a little bit more about Joseph as a student in your class and how his behavior has been in the weeks leading up to this event?

Mrs. Porter:

Yes, I can. I have known Joseph for about two years now. I knew of him last year and interacted with him at recess and lunch. I have had him in class now for about four months. Joseph has always been a quiet boy, very sweet and polite. He stayed mostly by himself, but was pleasant when you talked to him. I never noticed other kids teasing him. They seemed to like him. Even this year they continually ask him to join them in games and other activities. However, he prefers to be by himself. His work in most areas is above average. I have noticed that in the weeks prior to this event, his free writing topics seemed to focus more on his mom. The class was asked last week to write a fairy tale. Joseph wrote a story about a fairy godmother who would grant his wishes and he drew a picture of his family (mom, sister and him). He has never been a behavior problem in class. He is polite and cooperative. He does need prompting to engage and answer questions but will respond when asked.

Nicole Chesapeake:

Thank you, Dr. Manning and Mrs. Porter. These observations have been helpful.

Principal Walker, would you like to add your insights?

Principal Walker:

Joseph has not been a behavior problem at any point during his time here. This is the first time he has been sent to the principal’s office. When he was escorted down by Mrs. Jobes, he was cooperative and was not agitated. When asked if he knew why he was in my office he replied that he did. He stated that he knew what he said was wrong but just wanted to see his mom. He denied having a gun or access to a gun. Additional conversations with the foster family also didn’t indicate any access to a gun. I’m not a psychologist or a counselor, but he seemed very sad. We have been dealing with the family for several years, and this kid has really had a hard go of it.

Nicole Chesapeake:

Dr. Manning, would you mind jumping in here and talking a little bit about the work you have done with Joseph outside of school as his psychologist? What are your thoughts about his recent behavior?

Dr. Manning:

Joseph has experienced significant neglect over these early years of his life. However, he is very reflective and has a strong understanding of what has occurred. He has had to take on a caretaking role with his mother and feels that he has to be responsible for both his mother and his younger sister. He has expressed frustration as things have evolved over the past few months that he is not able to take control of the situation and that he feels that he does not have any choices. He concedes that the place he is in now is better for him and he will communicate that he feels happier. However, he continues to feel that he needs to be there for his mother and sister and that he wants to be the one to help them. I think we have to look at this incident as his way of taking control of his situation and as an expression of a more acute desire to see his mother, not to cause anyone harm.

Principal Walker:

But how can we be sure? That seems like a high-stakes risk to me. I feel for this young man, but I can’t take the risk that he will actually bring a gun to school. Can the team guarantee me that this is not going to happen?

Dr. Manning:

Human behavior is hard to predict. So no, I can’t make this kind of prediction. What I do know is that if the intervention team focuses on Joseph’s needs — the need to communicate his feelings, the need to be more a part of the decisions that are made on his behalf, and the need to see his mother — then I think that you will see a young man who won’t need to make a gesture such as this to get the attention of those around him. Developmentally, he can understand and communicate only to a certain extent. The communication skills and social-emotional development of an 8-year-old are not able to keep up with all that he has experienced. He communicated the best way he could figure out.

Nicole Chesapeake:

Thank you all for your thoughts and insights. This has been a great discussion. In summary, here is what I have heard:

Joseph has the ability to be successful in his educational environment and the incident that has occurred can be treated as an isolated incident.

Joseph’s coping strategy is to withdraw. Developmentally, he does not have the communication skills or the social-emotional development to deal with will that he has been faced with.

The team cannot guarantee that Joseph won’t carry out what he has stated or that he won’t act out again.

Supports and an intervention strategy need to be put into place to address the more significant underlying needs: Need to communicate, need to be included in the choices that are being made for him, and the need to see his mother.

Would you say that this is an accurate summation? Is there anything that I have missed?

Mrs. Porter:

I would like to add that I share some of the same concerns that Principal Walker has stated. I think Joseph is a sweet boy, and I feel for all that he has been through. But how can we be sure? This statement has been heard by my other students. How will they feel when he comes back to school?

Nicole Chesapeake:

Your concerns are valid, Mrs. Porter. There are many things to consider here. These points lead me to the next step in our process — the recommendation phase.

First, is there anyone here who believes that Joseph should not return to school?

Principal Walker:

Joseph is a young man who needs more than we can give him here at school. He has been through a great deal, but I also have to think about the entire school environment. I feel that time away from school at this point would be beneficial to Joseph.

Mrs. Porter:

I would agree. How can he learn when he has so much else to deal with? Another educational setting might be a better fit for him at this time.

Dr. Manning:

Interesting thoughts. I understand the larger concerns here. However, I feel I have to advocate for Joseph and feel that he can be successful here at school. School can be the one constant that he still has in his life. To be honest, it was probably the place he felt the safest. His comments were an attempt to get adults in an environment where he feels safe to pay attention to him. He was reaching out for help. I feel that with a more comprehensive support plan at school and more time working with me and his foster family outside of school, Joseph can successfully finish out his year at Samuals.

Nicole Chesapeake:

I want to thank everyone for their time today.

This is a difficult case without an easy answer.

Synthesis and Recommendation

Now, write a synthesis of the multiple points of view shared during the collaborative session. In addition, add any recommendation that you feel would be relevant to the team discussion.

Credits

Subject Matter Expert:

Paige Krabill, PsyD, LSP, HS-BCP

Interactive Design:

Estelle Domingos, Tessa Silver, Justin Lee, Marc Ashmore

Instructional Design:

Joe Lane

Project Manager:

Paula Varns, Julie Greunke

Voice Talent:

Rochelle William, Joe Lane, Kim Mason, Jim Nepp

Image Credits:

© iStockPhoto.com/nicole waring; © iStockPhoto.com/Igor Mojzes

Case 2 Collaboration Meeting

Introduction

The purpose of this exercise is to observe a collaborative session focused on a specific case. As you observe, you may want to take notes for your reference. Once you have read through the entire session, you will be asked to synthesize the multiple viewpoints that were given and come up with additional recommendations that might be relevant to the team. You will take this information back to the course room to complete several activities with this case.

The Meeting

Jane Adams, Job Placement Case Manager:

Good afternoon, everyone. Thanks for being here today. The team has been brought together to discuss the transition of Mark Fitzpatrick. Each of you should have received a case file for Mark prior to this meeting.

Just to recap, Mark has been an inmate at the Huntington Correctional Facility for four years. He is currently housed in the HCF Transition unit and has been working as part of the HCF Job Placement Program for the last three months. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss Mark and his ability to successfully transition into the Job Training program upon his release. We will start the discussion with James Patrick, Job Placement Program Coordinator.

James Patrick, Job Training Program Coordinator:

Good afternoon, everyone. Mark has been a solid student in our program and he has successfully met the competencies of the program. He was recommended for the program by the transition unit officers. They felt that his behavior on the floor was above average, and they felt that he would be able to successfully meet responsibilities and expectations of the program. I would have to say that this has been the case. Mark is currently working in the big engine mechanics program. His course instructor reports that Mark has been a stellar student and is very motivated to learn about this area of mechanics. We have been working with Mark on his ability to work well with others. He likes to keep to himself and seems to work better in environments such as this. We didn’t observe any difficulties taking orders from superiors.

Jessica Rimm, Mark’s Counselor:

I have a question for you. Is the nature of work that Mark will be going into more individually focused, or will he be expected to work in groups in an actual work setting?

James Patrick:

The majority of work that is done is on an individual basis. He will have to work with others at times when he needs to seek out information or when there are others who need to contribute. The advantage for Mark and what we know about his work style is that he is able to work well in these types of controlled settings and his work outcome is not dependent on others. He is more successful in situations like this and this is what he will find in the real work setting.

Jane Adams:

Thanks, James and great question, Jessica. Are there any other questions?

Okay, I will then ask Warden Lambert to speak next.

Warden Lambert:

I would have to agree with James when he says that Mark has been successful in the program. This has been a positive situation for Mark. However, outside of the program, we have seen some behavioral patterns the group needs to take into consideration when making this important decision.

Mark has worked hard during his time here, but he continues to struggle when he has to engage with others. We have seen that he can have difficulties controlling his emotions and his temper when he feels that he is asked to do something he doesn’t think is fair or isn’t appropriate for him to do. We have seen him work hard to contain these emotions. But I feel that he still has work to do when it comes to finding acceptable outlets for his feelings. Mark, like many of the guys in here, act before they think. I am concerned that if he is not in the right setting, there is potential for Mark to become aggressive.

Jessica Rimm:

I would agree with Warden Lambert in that Mark does have difficulty communicating his emotions appropriately. He becomes overwhelmed and easily frustrated. He is highly motivated to make a better life for himself and his young son, but at times does not have the skills he needs to appropriately cope. I am concerned about the unpredictable nature of the real world outside of this controlled setting and Mark’s ability to meet all of the challenges that he might be faced with.

Jane Adams:

Thank you all for your thoughts and insights. In summary, here is what I have heard:

Mark has the ability to be successful in a workplace setting if the conditions and environment allow him more time to work individually. Although he can work in group situation in a work context, there are concerns on the table that suggest that this might be a trigger for Mark.

Mark’s behavioral patterns suggest that he can become frustrated quickly. When this occurs he acts faster than he can think, often resulting in significant consequences.

Would you say that this is an accurate summation? Is there anything that I have missed?

Jessica Rimm:

I would also like to add that Mark has made great progress in recognizing triggers that cause him to react. His progress has been noteworthy in the limited time that he has been here. I do believe that with more time and work in this area, Mark has the potential to be able to appropriately manage his emotions. However, he still needs support.

Jane Adams:

This point leads me to the next step in our process — the recommendation phase. First, is there anyone here who believes that Mark is not ready to transition and his release time should be evaluated?

Warden Lambert:

I do believe that Mark would benefit from a few more months in the program and more time to continue his work with Jessica. We send these guys out too fast and they aren’t ready. I feel we really have a chance here to make sure that one of our guys has the skills he needs before we send him out.

Jessica Rimm:

I would have to disagree to some extent. I feel that Mark is capable of continuing his work and he is motivated to do so outside of this controlled setting. I feel that a transition plan that includes mandatory counseling sessions while working in the job placement setting would be ideal.

James Patrick:

I also feel that Mark can be successful in a job placement setting if the setting is right. A thorough review of the placement will need to be done to ensure that it is a good fit. Looking at a small setting with a willingness to allow for support would be ideal.

Jane Adams

This has been a great session! I want to thank you for your time as we work to create a transition plan that will be the most beneficial to Mark.

Synthesis and Recommendation

Now, write a synthesis of the multiple points of view shared during the collaborative session. In addition, add any recommendation that you feel would be relevant to the team discussion.

Credits

Subject Matter Expert:

Paige Krabill, PsyD, LSP, HS-BCP

Interactive Design:

Estelle Domingos, Tessa Silver, Justin Lee, Marc Ashmore

Instructional Design:

Joe Lane

Project Manager:

Paula Varns, Julie Greunke

Voice Talent:

Connie Lepro, Felicity Pearson, Al Harkrader, Kevin Allen

Image Credits:

© iStockPhoto.com/nicole waring; © iStockPhoto.com/Igor Mojzes

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.

Thanks for installing the Bottom of every post plugin by Corey Salzano. Contact me if you need custom WordPress plugins or website design.

Hi there! Click one of our representatives below and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Chat with us on WhatsApp